what are little boys made of ?

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What are little boys made of?
Snips and snails
And puppy-dogs’ tails,
That’s what little boys are made of.
What are little girls made of?
What are little girls made of?
Sugar and spice
And everything nice,
That’s what little girls are made of.

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that’s what little boys are made of 100
thats what little boys are made of 70
what are little boys/girls made of song

 

About what are little boys made of?

Here we say “snakes and snails” (culebras y caracoles). Disagreeable things, in contrast to the sugar and spice, and everything nice, those little girls are made of.

Snips and snails and puppy dog tails. The oldest written words were snigs and snails and puppy-dog tails. Snig is slang for Eels, Sniggle is a type of fish hook for eel fishing. However, snig, snag, frog, snake, and slug are other commonly used words to replace snips. All of these can be used to refer to bugs, slimy things, and “creepy” creatures. Even snip can refer to a type of beetle. Keep in mind our modern meaning of words may vary compared to middle and old English, let alone slang terms. The rhyme itself is believed to be from the 1800s however as it was an oral rhyme first, it has many variations. When I read it or tell someone the rhyme, I always envision a kid bringing in a handful of bugs and mud…Or even, like myself as a lad, a frog in my pocket. It is easy to see it as just a boy playing outside, now the rhyme is also a product of its time, and the sugar and spice, and all things nice part shows. These all relate to the kitchen. (again 1800’s) But there are other interpretations of the rhyme that can get interesting and weird the more you look into the meaning of various words. rhymes have a habit of having darker meanings then just the surface words, common examples are Ring around the Rosy, Jack and Jill, The Girl with the Golden cap(Red riding hood), Jack and the beanstalk, and Little Boy Blue to name a few. The “presumed” first person to write it down also wrote goldilocks and the three bears. So, in the end, it can mean whatever you think it does, and can be said in any fashion you want. “Planks and Sails with new shinny nails…. that’s what little toys are made of.” See.
I actually never heard this rhyme as a kid and found out about it from the 90’s PPG’s…When telling it I also like to emphasize certain words so it’s more like a chant than the song. Not a fan of the musical notes that go with it.

See also  Pomme de reinette et pomme d api

we are going on a bear hunt lyrics

 

There is a well-known nursery rhyme that goes: What are little boys made of? Snips and snails and puppy dogs’ tails… The only one of the three components that make sense is the puppy dogs’ tails. I can´t figure out why boys are made up with snips (meaning scissors, here?), let alone snails (runny noses, perhaps? But do little girls not drool as well?) Or are nursery rhymes essentially nonsensical?

 

The most likely explanation (but not 100% certain) is that the original words were ‘snips of snails and puppy-dogs’ tails’, where ‘snips’ means ‘little bits/pieces of’. The repeated /sn/ has a certain ring about it and, of course, the rhyme between ‘snails’ and ‘tails’ is important.

The poem was probably written by a girl! :D

Source:https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/snips-and-snails.3190238/

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